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The new European data regulation introduces new rules for the use of information from smart devices. These rules define rights to access and use data created in the EU across all economic sectors and across smart devices from different manufacturers.

At the end of 2023, the Hungarian Parliament adopted the Act on the Digital State and Certain Rules for the Provision of Digital Services (“Digital State Act”), the majority provisions of which will enter into force on 1 July 2024. This act opens a new era in the digitalization of public services, serving the 21st-century administrative needs of the Hungarian people and economic operators.

The Supreme Court of Cassation of the Republic of Bulgaria recognized under "exceptional circumstances," the right of an active partner in a limited liability company to act as an ad hoc representative. This decision references to Articles 6 and 13 of the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (ECPHRFF) and the case law of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR).

North Macedonia faces an increasing interest and need to attract foreign workers to fill low-skilled job positions. The existing regulatory framework, however, poses significant barriers to employing foreign nationals. This article will outline the benefits of simplifying these procedures, the pressing need for reform, and how changes could align Macedonia with broader European Union trends.

We bring you a brief overview of important legislative news from the Czech Republic that should not escape your attention.

According to the decision of the Court of Justice of the European Union of 16 May 2024 (C-746/22), the Hungarian rule that does not allow foreign taxpayers in VAT refund cases to submit their documents even in the appeal procedure is contrary to EU law. We have summarised the key lessons learned from the case which was handled by our office.

EU legislation on crypto-assets is based on the EU Regulation on Markets in Crypto Assets (as known as MiCA), which is directly applicable in the Member States, including Hungary.

On 15 May 2024, the Law of Ukraine “On amendments to the Labour Code of Ukraine on employment relations in case of business entity transfer” entered into force. The new Law establishes additional guarantees to employees in the event of business transfer. The Law aims at approximation of the national legislation to the Transfers of Undertakings Directive 2001/23/EC of 12 March 2001.

Companies are not obliged to use the stamp while doing business, as stated in Article 15 paragraph 1 of the Company law of Montenegro ("Company Law"). The legislator’s intention when prescribing freedom while regulating use of stamps in doing business was to unburden the Company’s business, i.e. to not burden the business with additional formal conditions, as well as to leave the issue of the use of the stamp to the company to regulate it by a general or special internal act.

As we outlined in our earlier article, the option of a demerger by means of a spin-off (odštiepenie) is a significant innovation introduced into the Slovak corporate landscape by the Transformations Act.

Similarly to other countries, the Czech Republic is undergoing a digital transformation. Without a doubt, this transformation allows businesses to facilitate their operations and makes all of our lives much easier. On the other hand, this transformation leads to new cybersecurity threats that may hinder businesses and cause significant losses.

The Czech economy entered a deep slump in 2023 caused by the rather rare and unfortunate combination of negative economic and geopolitical factors, including one of the highest inflation rates in the EU, rising interest rates, high energy prices, a large public finance deficit, and the adverse impacts of the war in Ukraine. Altogether, these economic difficulties resulted not just in an economic recession but also adversely affected the Czech M&A market.

While local courts have been taking the stance that mortgage over the land does not extend to objects subsequently built on the mortgaged land, in one recent case, the Supreme Court of Republika Srpska (RS Supreme Court) took an entirely opposite one. Applicable laws support the stance of the RS Supreme Court. Clear treatment of this issue by the courts is important for both mortgage creditors and buyers of subsequently-built objects.

Respecting intellectual property rights (IPR) in Bosnia and Herzegovina is a journey less traveled, yet one of paramount importance in today’s digital age. In a world where information knows no bounds and creative works are easily shared with a click, the value of safeguarding original ideas and innovations often takes a back seat. Let’s dive into this exploration of the complexities surrounding intellectual property in a landscape where imitation frequently overshadows ingenuity. The lack of awareness and enforcement mechanisms regarding IPR poses significant challenges for creators and innovators striving to protect their work. Without proper safeguards in place, the risk of exploitation and unauthorized use looms large, hindering the growth of a dynamic and inventive environment within the nation. Additionally, as technology continues to advance at a rapid pace, navigating the intricate web of intellectual property laws becomes increasingly daunting for individuals and businesses alike.

In the last decade, Montenegro has focused on creating a favorable business environment, attracting renowned foreign investors and resulting in significant economic development and growth. The government has been focusing on high-level tourism, transitioning from seasonal to year-round hotels that offer luxurious stays and services.