24
Sat, Jun
69 New Articles

All Briefings

Grid List

In recent times, more and more international companies are outsourcing their call centres and data processing facilities to Serbia.

The Hungarian Parliament modified the provisions on the implementation of the Country-by-Country Reporting (CbCR) system according to the 2016/1164 EU directive. These changes relate to the obligation of the transfer pricing documentation for multinational enterprises.

The Corporations Act provides that the venue, date and time of a general meeting must be set in such a manner that shareholders’ rights to attend (and vote) are not unreasonably limited. Would this statutory requirement be met if the general meeting were held in a foreign country? If so, under what circumstances?

According to Seth, the pen name of Canadian cartoonist Gregory Gallant, “We can’t suddenly quit a job and then race to find a form of art that will pay off before the next mortgage payment is due. Creating art is a habit, one that we practice daily or hourly until we get good at it.… Art isn’t about the rush of victory that comes from being picked.” 

Due to the increasing activities of state authorities concerning the liability of juridical persons in general, but especially regarding corporate criminal liability, the topic of compliance is no longer seen only as a formal requirement but is becoming more and more important in the Czech Republic in almost all areas of law.

With Croatia joining the European Union and assuming the obligation to implement EU law, compliance became the key word in the country’s legal market. At first, the complicated regulatory environment produced legal uncertainty in entire industries.

2015 and 2016 turned into a period of reform for the Ukrainian antitrust regulatory framework and the Ukrainian competition authority – the Antimonopoly Committee of Ukraine (AMC).

In the era of modern business, where strengthening of existing businesses and encouraging startups is a GDP must, improving the investment environment is common sense, and compliance should serve the benefit of it all, one should stop and wonder at the sight of what we call “twisted compliance.”

There are a number of not-so-obvious issues related to running an internal investigation that are often missed or simply disregarded as not important. Some of them pose risks to the success of the investigation, while others may not only jeopardize the results but also lead to potentially severe liability of the company and/or the individuals running the investigation).

In recent years suspicions regarding massive conflicts of interest, corruption, and the favoritism of creditors have created the political will to mandate the disclosure of ownership backgrounds of companies dealing with public finances. Attorneys from Taylor Wessing Bratislava have participated in the preparation of the so-called Anti-Letterbox Companies Act, which entered into force on February 1, 2017.

Restrictive agreements and practices in Macedonia are governed by the Protection of Competition Act (2010) (the “Competition Act”), which entered into force on November 13, 2010.

Prior to building up or transplanting their advertising campaigns in Greece, businesses wishing to acquire a share in the local media market, besides familiarizing themselves with their industry sector through review and analysis of the industry economics, participants, and main competitors, should immerse themselves into the regulatory framework for advertising that will enable them to develop their business plan and marketing strategies most efficiently.

As a result of several mid-sized acquisitions in 2016, many foreign companies interested in buying shares in limited liability companies in Bulgaria have faced questions about how the management of such business entities are controlled and what the risks are of detection, after the acquisition, of “hidden liabilities” due to the potentially non-compliant behavior of those companies’ statutory representatives with good corporate standards.

In May 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – which will be directly applicable in all member states – will come into force, harmonizing the data protection regime to a major extent. However, several of the GDPR’s opening clauses delegate responsibility for further regulation to national legislators. International companies will thus still have to consider local laws when preparing for GDRP-compliance. 

It would not be unreasonable to suggest that most developments in commercial markets occur as a result of competition between participants and manufacturers of similar products. From an end-user’s perspective, it is always easier to recognize products and/or make comparisons between products on the basis of specific brands/trademarks. 

In recent years information security issues have become extremely important for companies in Russia and around the world. For example, in 2015, almost 300 million U.S. dollars were stolen from more than 100 banks and other financial institutions throughout the world. By the middle of 2016, FinCERT, the Russian system of monitoring of cybersecurity incidents in the financial sphere, had registered 21 targeted attacks aimed at thievery of approximately 2.87 billion rubles (approx. USD 48 million). In addition, during 2016, major Russian banks such as Sberbank, Otkritie, Alfa-Bank, VTB, and Rosbank suffered massive DDoS attacks.

Sensationalism – a word that often causes the media to “forget” about the law and ethics and trade them in for greater circulation/ratings. Serbia is not an exception to this phenomenon, unfortunately, especially when it comes to reporting about public figures.

Reorganization was introduced in Serbian bankruptcy legislation in 2010 and is very often used to restructure claims, as it provides an opportunity for a debtor to continue operating if the settlement proposed through a reorganization plan is more favorable to creditors than liquidation.

As a developing country with limited resources, Serbia is inclined to use public-private partnerships (PPP) to improve its infrastructure and increase the quality of public services.

In the last decade, as a result of the global economic crisis and the accompanying recession, there has been a significant increase in NPL ratios throughout the SEE region.

Lately, investors have had fairly high expectations for the Serbian real estate market. New and improved real estate and construction regulations, updates to the urban plans, and the announcement of significant projects all indicate that a very interesting period is in front of us.

As Serbia doubles down on its EU accession efforts, the pivotal role of State aid in a crucial negotiation chapter creates serious challenges for the finalization of country’s prolonged privatizations and the continuation of its recently revamped subsidy scheme for foreign and local investors. 

Serbia’s 2010 Anti-Mobbing Act prescribes the procedure for fighting workplace harassment in a detailed manner. Employers are obliged to familiarize all staff members with the anti-mobbing procedure by providing them with an info sheet before they commence work.

The National Bank of Serbia has invested significant efforts to harmonize national regulations in the field of payment systems with those of the EU.