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Suppose you were a German bank lending to a Spanish debtor under a loan agreement governed by German law. Once your Spanish debtor stops paying, the bank would have to obtain a German legal judgment and would then have to enforce it in Spain.

The Hungarian Ministry of Justice has submitted to the Parliament the bill on the new International Private Law Act on 28 February 2017.

The Romanian code regulating audiovisual content has been recently amended. Among the changes, we mention the fact that minors can no longer be used in food advertising. Also, an important modification provides that the advertising of food supplements must contain the data approved by the authorities. This month’s cover article examines these changes and the broader context of these specific regulations.

In order to comply with the provisions of the new Hungarian Civil Code, limited liability companies (Kft.) shall increase the amount of their registered capital up to HUF 3 million.

Good news for all the members of the Serbia Film Commission! On 31 January, the Serbian minister of culture and information, Mr. Vladan Vukosavljević, signed the revised version of the European Convention on Cinematographic Co-production in Rotterdam. This now enables Serbia to participate in co-productions even with non-European countries.

2016 was a notable year in Russia for the extension of control over, and further clarification of, data localization requirements; establishment of a strategy for the further development of personal data legislation and an increase in attention to cybersecurity issues.

The Ministry of Environment and Urbanization recently adopted the new Regulation on Control of Medical Waste (the “Medical Waste Regulation”).

Foreign Investors Council in Serbia (FIC), as an organization acting in favor of interests of foreign investors establishing their businesses in Serbia, issues a report every year listing all the recommendations of the private sector to the public authorities that could remove unnecessary barriers and problems in the business functioning. Issued regularly since 2003, the “White book” tries to tackle all the possible issues that would make doing business in Serbia easier and more flexible.

On February 3, 2017, Resolution of the Cabinet of the Ministers of Ukraine No. 28 “On Amendments to Order on Issuance, Prolongation and Cancellation of Work Permits for Foreign Nationals and Stateless Persons”, dated January 18, 2017 (the "Resolution"), became effective.

As of 23 January 2017, a new, user-friendly website equipped with innovative searching functions was introduced for civil society and other organisations (excluding companies) to fulfill their disclosure requirements.

At the beginning of February 2017, the Hungarian Ministry of National Development published a summarizing report on the companies’ obligations to provide information for consumer protection.

A novelty introduced in 2017 was that tax returns prepared by the tax authority will be available for tax payers online on the so-called “Ügyfélkapu” from 15 March 2017.

On February 10, 2017, the Capital Markets Board of Turkey (the “CMB”) published amendments to the following communiqués:

Turkey’s first and only law specifically dedicated to data protection and privacy, the Law No. 6698 on Protection of Personal Data (“Law No. 6698”), came into force on April 7, 2016 with certain transition periods. The Data Protection Board has been formed, but is not yet functioning. The secondary legislation is still pending, although certain sector-specific regulations have been put in place, and is expected to be completed by April 7, 2017.

In the European Union, competence of courts is harmonized and regulated by Brussels Ibis regulation No. 1215/2012 (the “Regulation”). The competence of courts determined by the Regulation is protected and applies unless the Regulation stipulates otherwise. Arbitration is not subject to EU harmonized regulations. It is governed by international treaties, most notably the New York Convention.

The unique political and administrative landscape of Bosnia and Herzegovina has resulted in far too many legislative levels and regulations for a country of its size.

2016 has been a challenging year for dispute resolution in Poland, due primarily to the numerous changes in regulatory framework that have come or will come into effect. In particular, since the country’s 2015 parliamentary elections, the government has been working on regulations related to group action proceedings, procedures for collecting claims, and various criminal law issues. 

Hungary’s current Act on Civil Litigation Procedures was adopted in 1953, and it served courts, counsels, and parties in litigations well over decades of the socialist regime.

Directive 2013/11/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of May 21, 2013, on alternative dispute resolution for consumer disputes (“Directive on Consumer ADR”) obliged Member States to bring into force the laws, regulations, and administrative provisions necessary to comply with it by July 9, 2015. 

Since former Of Counsel of Taylor Wessing Bratislava Lucia Zitnanska was appointed Slovak Minister of Justice in April 2016, the legislative changes prepared by her department have primarily been driven by the practical need to improve the enforceability of law and increase the importance of e-communication tools. To those ends, two major reforms concerning debt enforcement will enter into force in the first half of 2017.

Even at first blush, it is apparent that arbitration and insolvency make strange bedfellows.

Debt recovery is one of the most challenging parts of day-to-day business, especially in an environment where debtors aim to hinder enforcement by fraudulently diminishing their estate. 

Currently, one of the main issues in Slovenia is the ruling in late October 2016 of the Constitutional Court of Slovenia regarding constitutional rights violations suffered by investors in five major Slovenian banks when both their equity capital and the subordinated instruments were written off as a result of extraordinary measures exercised by the Bank of Slovenia between December 2013 and December 2014 as a result of the systemic banking crisis. 

In November, the Bulgarian Parliament began debating the amendments to the Competition Protection Act (CPA) with respect to the implementation of the EU’s Directive 2014/104/EE on Damages Actions for Antitrust Infringements (the “Directive”). Interestingly, the main aim of the Directive and the proposed amendments to the CPA – facilitating the private enforcement of infringements of competition law – coincides with what is probably the biggest cartel investigation in the history of the Bulgarian Commission for Competition Protection (CCP).