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One of the new possibilities introduced by the new Serbian General Administrative Procedure Act is an administrative guarantee.  It is a statement issued by an authority that it will issue an administrative act at the request of a party.  By issuing an administrative guarantee, the authority guarantees that the act issued will have a precisely defined content.

On 22 September 2017 the public debate on the proposed amendments to the Serbian Companies Act (hereinafter: the “Act“) was initiated.  The changes of the Act are expected to create conditions for further development of the concept of e-government, and are mainly focused on expediting the process of company registration and creating space for further europeanization of business environment in Serbia upon accession to the EU.

Leasing of employees – a situation in which employment agencies hire employees and act as their formal employers and then lease them to perform actual work for their client companies – has become a frequent phenomenon in Serbia the past few years. 

In recent years, many international companies set up its operations in Serbia, in the form of subsidiaries or branch offices, not least due to the generous incentives that have been provided through a number of government schemes.  

On 12 July 2017, Serbian Commission for Protection of Competition (the “Commission”) enacted a Decision by which it enacted a measure for protection of competition due to implementation of concentration contrary to the legal obligation to notify the Commission of the concentration and to receive its prior approval, even though the legally stipulated revenue thresholds for reporting the concentration in this particular case were met (the “Decision”).

Serbian legislation provides for a maternity leave compensation in the amount of the mother’s average salary in the last 12 months before the leave. The compensations is paid from the state budget, but the procedure of ascertaining the right to maternity leave compensation is conducted by local government.

Serbian national electricity company, Electric Power Industry of Serbia (“EPS”), is working actively on the development of systems for generation of renewables. Some of the most important ventures at the moment are construction of solar and wind farm in Kostolac, a small town in the eastern part of Serbia, as well as support to investments in the field of biofuels.

During the last year, the number of labor disputes which were resolved through mediation and arbitration in Serbia have increased fivefold. To improve the process of peaceful labor dispute resolution, amendents to the Amicable Labor Dispute Resolution Act (the “Act”) are expected.

“There is quite a lot going on, on both the political and economic sides” says Milan Samardzic, Partner at Samardzic Oreski and Grbovic law firm in Belgrade, although he concedes that, in the period leading up to the recent April 2 election (which resulted in the election of Prime Minister Aleksandar Vucic to President), much work has been put on hold. Indeed, Serbia has gone through two straight years of elections, Samardzic points out, causing the country a more extensive period of inactivity than might otherwise have been expected.

Bad news for Euro pessimists! Serbia is about to open four new chapters in the negotiation accession process by July 1st. Namely, issues related to corporate law, intellectual property, foreign economic relations and customs are about to be discussed by the Serbian and the EU officials in the following months in order to adapt them to the requirements of the EU’s unified market and economic standards.

Good news for all the members of the Serbia Film Commission! On 31 January, the Serbian minister of culture and information, Mr. Vladan Vukosavljević, signed the revised version of the European Convention on Cinematographic Co-production in Rotterdam. This now enables Serbia to participate in co-productions even with non-European countries.

Foreign Investors Council in Serbia (FIC), as an organization acting in favor of interests of foreign investors establishing their businesses in Serbia, issues a report every year listing all the recommendations of the private sector to the public authorities that could remove unnecessary barriers and problems in the business functioning. Issued regularly since 2003, the “White book” tries to tackle all the possible issues that would make doing business in Serbia easier and more flexible.

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SOG / Samardzic, Oreski & Grbovic at a Glance

SOG / Samardžić, Oreški & Grbović is a full service business law firm providing the highest quality legal advice across a wide range of key areas of corporate law in Serbia and the Western Balkans. We are particularly noted for legal expertise, high professional and ethical standards, attention to detail, and responsiveness. SOG is firmly committed to providing advice at the highest level and achieving lasting results for our clients.

In order to provide our regional and international clients having business interests in more than one jurisdiction, we have also established a strong regional presence through our partner offices in Bosnia & Herzegovina, Macedonia, and Montenegro. This way, our clients gain a full spectrum of support and the most up to date and nuanced advice on the business and regulatory environment across the entire region.

Firm's website: www.sog.rs